Im Dead Inside

NetBeans, Eclipse or IntelliJ?

NetBeans, Eclipse or IntelliJ  

8 members have voted

  1. 1. NetBeans, Eclipse or IntelliJ



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I don't know what any of these mean, but I'm gonna pretend I do and vote for NetBeans because I like how it sounds

 

 

A quick google search shows that they are Java IDEs, which means they are applications that help in developing applications.

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Even though I have Java this semester and it's already almost two months now, I still haven't coded anything in Java for college. Partly because I had trouble installing NetBeans.

 

I'll go with NetBeans though since it was the first IDE I ever used way back in 8th grade. Though I may change this after I see what the others have to say and what I experience myself. 

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I've been coding in java for 2.5 years now and I've only used Eclipse (and BlueJ but it really doesn't count lol) so I won't vote

Edited by Agent P

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On 2/21/2019 at 6:35 AM, Agent P said:

I've been coding in java for 2.5 years now and I've only used Eclipse (and BlueJ but it really doesn't count lol) so I won't vote

I've used Eclipse and NetBeans. I prefer NetBeans (at least the pre-apache versions, but we'll see.) My only complaint is you need plugins to get a dark mode with NetBeans. Otherwise, I'm not sure why, but I prefer it over Eclipse. (Maybe because it's advertised by Oracle idk)

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So, for the longest time, my answer to this question would have been Eclipse. However; I got to try the professional version of IntelliJ's IDEA, and I really loved it! Hands down the best IDE I've used, besides maybe Visual Studio (I'm a C# Dev now).

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8 hours ago, Gramps said:

So, for the longest time, my answer to this question would have been Eclipse. However; I got to try the professional version of IntelliJ's IDEA, and I really loved it! Hands down the best IDE I've used, besides maybe Visual Studio (I'm a C# Dev now).

I kinda dislike IntelliJ because IDEA is pretty crappy performance wise.

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On 2/26/2019 at 7:46 PM, Gramps said:

So, for the longest time, my answer to this question would have been Eclipse. However; I got to try the professional version of IntelliJ's IDEA, and I really loved it! Hands down the best IDE I've used, besides maybe Visual Studio (I'm a C# Dev now).

I use Visual Studio too. I might switch to it completely now, I'm trying to stop using IDEs and sticking with just text editors and compilers. 

On 2/25/2019 at 10:11 PM, Rob said:

i use eclipse in the class i teach. mostly because it has a cool name

You teach a class? Also, I didn't know you were learning coding at college. Nice :D 

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On 2/28/2019 at 1:49 PM, Master Flap said:

I use Visual Studio too. I might switch to it completely now, I'm trying to stop using IDEs and sticking with just text editors and compilers.

You might think this makes you seem more "professional" or like less of a noob but do not do this. In professional environments, IDEs are used. This is for some good reasons -

It saves a lot of time being able to access the text and compilation options from the same place.

Code correction is more time-saving than you think. Simple things such as adding end quotes/brackets/whatever save a LOT of time when added up.

Also, IDEs show you a better explanation of where errors are. Rather than having a vague error from a direct compiler, it makes it easier to get to the line the error is on and identify what the error is.

 

I obviously can't make you use IDEs, but if you are doing it in a professional environment, DO not just use text editors and compilers. You'll be wasting a lot of your own time and also possibly other peoples'.

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I'm going to go with NetBeans. I've only tried NetBeans and IntelliJ. And I like NetBeans, mainly cause of performance.

On 3/3/2019 at 4:15 AM, Im Dead Inside said:

You might think this makes you seem more "professional" or like less of a noob but do not do this. In professional environments, IDEs are used.

Personally, I think when you're starting out learning a language. Sticking to a text editor and command line tools really helps you develop and appreciation and understanding of what goes into getting your program to run.

And of course, editors like VS Code have IntelliSense which helps you understand your code too.

Edited by Jade Maveric

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19 hours ago, Im Dead Inside said:

You might think this makes you seem more "professional" or like less of a noob but do not do this. In professional environments, IDEs are used. This is for some good reasons -

It saves a lot of time being able to access the text and compilation options from the same place.

Code correction is more time-saving than you think. Simple things such as adding end quotes/brackets/whatever save a LOT of time when added up.

Also, IDEs show you a better explanation of where errors are. Rather than having a vague error from a direct compiler, it makes it easier to get to the line the error is on and identify what the error is.

 

I obviously can't make you use IDEs, but if you are doing it in a professional environment, DO not just use text editors and compilers. You'll be wasting a lot of your own time and also possibly other peoples'.

Well duh, IDEs exist for a reason. I'm doing it to get a feel for the language better, not to do professional work. I am still too much of a noob to be doing that. 

(I do prefer IDEs but I want to make the switch to see how I cope)

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On 3/3/2019 at 2:36 PM, Master Flap said:

Well duh, IDEs exist for a reason. I'm doing it to get a feel for the language better, not to do professional work. I am still too much of a noob to be doing that. 

(I do prefer IDEs but I want to make the switch to see how I cope)

Personally I don't understand how it helps you get a feel for the language better but to each their own I guess.

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On 2/28/2019 at 10:49 AM, Master Flap said:

I use Visual Studio too. I might switch to it completely now, I'm trying to stop using IDEs and sticking with just text editors and compilers. 

You teach a class? Also, I didn't know you were learning coding at college. Nice :D 

yeah i teach (teacher assist but mostly teach tbh) and i've always liked eclipse. i'm studying to be the IT guy, but i mostly want to do cybersecurity or networking

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4 hours ago, Rob said:

yeah i teach (teacher assist but mostly teach tbh) and i've always liked eclipse. i'm studying to be the IT guy, but i mostly want to do cybersecurity or networking

Oooh nice. How's that coming along? 

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On 3/6/2019 at 1:33 AM, Master Flap said:

Oooh nice. How's that coming along? 

have an interview tomorrow and another on tuesday, working on getting internships

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On 3/8/2019 at 8:16 AM, Rob said:

have an interview tomorrow and another on tuesday, working on getting internships

Ooh all the best :D

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Here's the thing, fellas. I use the cheapest and simplest IDE I can find. It doesn't even have fancy features lol. It's called BlueJ and it's a kiddy IDE, but hey, it gets the job done for me.

USE AN IDE THAT YOU CAN USE WELL/ARE FAMILIAR WITH.

It really doesn't matter for most people unless y'all are senior developers working for big 4 companies and have to achieve very specific tasks under specialised conditions. All the IDEs you mentioned are incredibly overwhelming to new users. They have a steep learning curve and a surplus of features and options than you could feel suffocated with. Even tinkering with them for hours hardly makes a difference unless you know what you're looking for. It's analogous to people who buy gaming PCs to play Solitaire: you only get the full benefit if you're looking for something specific and you know what you're doing.

By the way, Visual Studio is another popular one you missed. At my internship, most developers around me used that. Another intern, who was a colleague of mine, used Eclipse, but I never really got the hang of it despite making a few classes with it.

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